Monday, March 11, 2013

The legacy of Hugo Chavez: part 4

Mr Chavez placed a great emphasis on providing financial and medical aid to the rest of Latin America, bolstered by the profits produced by the Venezuela oil industry. In the first eight months of 2007 alone, Venezuela spent $8.8 billion in doing so, something which was simply unprecedented for a Latin American country in terms of scale. In 2007 when Daniel Ortega was re-elected president in Nicaragua, Mr Chavez announced plans to aid the impoverished Central American country by forgiving the $30 million it owed Venezuela, and agreed to supply them with a further gift of $10 million in aid, as well as providing them with a $20-million loan with little or no interest and designed to benefit the country’s poor.  In September 2009, Mr Chavez along with allies in Argentina, Brazil and Bolivia, set up a regional bank and development lender called the Bank of the South, based in the Venezuelan capital city of Caracas with the aim of distancing the Latin American countries from the grips of the financial institutions such as the International Monetary Fund. He maintained that unlike other global financial organisations, the Bank of the South will be managed and funded by the countries of the region with the intention of funding social and economic development without any political conditions on that funding.
As much as president Hugo Chavez was a hero to millions of the downtrodden people in his country and elsewhere, and the anti-imperialist forces around the globe, he was equally despised by many powerful leaders of our time, let alone the members of the upper class in his own country. According to his biographers Marcano and Tyszka, Mr Chavez has ‘already earned his place in history as the president most loved and most despised by the Venezuelan people, the president who inspired the greatest zeal and the deepest revulsion at the same time.’

The legacy of Hugo Chavez: part 3

The foundation stone of Mr Chavez’s presidency was the Bolivarian Revolution: his ambitious plan to turn Venezuela into a socialist state. His sincere dedication to improve the miserable condition of the poor people, traditionally ignored and marginalised by Latin American politicians, made him a hero among a large sector of the population. As a result of his policies, the percentage of Venezuelans living under the poverty line declined from a peak of 62 per cent in 2003 to 29 per cent in 2009, according to World Bank statistics. Between 2001 and 2007, illiteracy fell from 7 per cent to 5 per cent. The poor in Venezuela became Mr Chavez’s main political weapon, and the movement behind him came to be known as ‘Chavismo’. It prioritised the redistribution of oil wealth to the marginalised and valued sovereignty as something to be protected from ‘imperialist’ powers. His concern for the poor knew no boundaries. He supplied heating oil to the poor in the north-eastern states of the US at a much discounted price through Venezuela’s national oil company Citgo. He did the same favour for the poor in Europe.

The legacy of Hugo Chavez: part 2

Mr Chavez spent two years in prison before being granted a pardon. In 1997, he re-launched his party as the Movement of the Fifth Republic and made the transition from soldier to politician. In 1998, riding a wave of popular resentment at the traditional political elite, he caused a seismic tremor in Venezuelan politics to win the presidency. Since then, he won a series of elections and referendums, including one in 2009 that abolished term limits for all elected officials, including the president. The foundation stone of Mr Chavez’s presidency was the Bolivarian Revolution: his ambitious plan to turn Venezuela into a socialist state. His sincere dedication to improve the miserable condition of the poor people, traditionally ignored and marginalised by Latin American politicians, made him a hero among a large sector of the population. As a result of his policies, the percentage of Venezuelans living under the poverty line declined from a peak of 62 per cent in 2003 to 29 per cent in 2009, according to World Bank statistics. Between 2001 and 2007, illiteracy fell from 7 per cent to 5 per cent.

The legacy of Hugo Chavez: part 1

THE charismatic leader of Venezuela, Hugo Chavez, died last Tuesday after a long battle with cancer. He was only 58. The former army paratrooper first came to prominence as a leader of a failed coup in February 1992, to overthrow the government of president Carlos Andres Perez amid growing anger at economic austerity measures. He and a group of fellow military officers involved in the coup belonged to a secret movement — the Revolutionary Bolivarian Movement, which was named after the South American independence leader Simon Bolivar (1783-1830), who was born and buried in Venezuela.

Saturday, March 9, 2013

Environment in distress

For the last three decades scientists and world leaders have been trying to cope with the consequences of exponential growth in human numbers and the increasingly frantic demands for the resources that only nature can provide. They have been working to save threatened species from extinction and to give the natural process of our world the chance to maintain a healthy global biosphere. That means some sacrifices and restraints. Evidently, we can no longer pursue short term prosperity without a thought for long term survival. People in some industrialized countries have missed the fact that efforts to achieve conservation of nature threaten human economic welfare. But nations realize that a good quality of life can only be made up of both material well-being as well as a healthy, productive and natural environment. For millions of people living in the less prosperous parts of the world, like Bangladesh, care and conservation of natural resources, restraint, and cautious disposal of toxic wastes, hazardous effluents and sludge from the industries are the only ways to improve conditions.

Women’s Bank

The goals of VISION 2021, joining the ranks of middle-income countries by the 50th anniversary of independence of Bangladesh, cannot be achieved without emancipation of women. The government has given priority to women empowerment in all the development programmes. One of such efforts is the introduction of the National Women Development Policy 2011. A successful implementation of the policy requires economic freedom of women which, in turn, depends on more participation of women in businesses and industries than there is at present. Entrepreneurship development of women is highly warranted. This needs counseling and capital. A national level banking network exclusively serving women to cater to their banking needs is an imperative to achieve the goals of Vision 2021 as well as those of the Women Development Policy.

The hidden danger of climate change

Climate change is just one of the destructive forces to blight south-western Bangladesh. Naturally occurring events (which are independent of climate change), and poor governance, are also weighing heavily on this troubled region. In order to effectively combat the destructive processes that combine to shape this corner of South Asia it is crucial that we gain a proper understanding of the issues at hand. We can begin by acting to distinguish between the causes of the impacts we see, and not settling for the use of ‘climate change’ as a one-size-fits-all explanation. The southwest corner of Bangladesh is not an easy place to live in. If you speak with villagers in districts like Satkhira (who count the Bengal tiger as a neighbour) you quickly realise you are talking with some of the most resilient people on the planet. The scale of problems they face can be difficult to comprehend: extreme poverty pervades the lives of many, the seasons are changing and rains are coming later, agricultural yields are decreasing, flooding and water-logging is decimating livelihoods, freshwater is becoming scarce as salinity increases and powerful cyclones demolish homes and erase lives. People don’t cite Bangladesh as the frontline of climate change for nothing. By the year 2050 sea levels here are expected to rise by up to 40 centimetres. Average temperatures, which have risen 0.74°C in the past 60 years, are predicted to jump up to a further 4°C by the close of the century. There is little doubt that climate change will have a profound effect in Bangladesh. Experts anticipate further decreases in food security and the availability of freshwater and increased flooding. One model predicts that by the year 2100 climate change will displace a staggering 16-20 million people in Bangladesh; a group roughly twice the current population of the Dhaka city!

Friday, March 8, 2013

Ensuring Women's Rights

International Women's Day was celebrated in the country on Friday (8th March) aiming to promote and ensure the rights of women. This year the theme of the day in Bangladesh is "Women's right to information, commitment to build up a digital Bangladesh." President Zillur Rahman and Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina and opposition leader Khaleda Zia issued separate messages on the occasion. The President said that women alongside men have made important contributions to all sectors of development since ancient times. In this age of globalization it is impossible to face the challenges of the 21st century excluding women. The Prime Mister said that women should be conscious about realising their rights through being totally informed , whence they would be able to ensure their participation in the mainstream of development .The Leader of the Opposition said that women's participation in all aspects of the state and the society should be ensured to build up a happy, rich and self-reliant Bangladesh. Several organisations have chalked out elaborate programmes to mark the day. Movements for gender empowerment started form the previous centuries. In 1857 thousands of women in New York took to the streets to protest against inequitable wages, working hours and sexual harassment at the workplace. In 1908, a large number of women assembled in New York to realise their rights to suffrage. In 1910, 100 women representing 17 countries decided to initiate an International Women's Day (IWD) at an International Conference of Socialist Women in Copenhagen, Denmark and the first IWD was held in 1911in Germany, Austria and Denmark. The United Nations for the first time formally proclaimed International Women's Year on March 8, 1975. Since that day IWFD has emerged as the most important day for women's empowerment across the world. We look forward to the end of violence against women and giving all citizen's rights to women and educating women at the same level as men so that they can achieve a digital Bangladesh side by side with the menfolk.

Developing tourism

Among the neighbouring and adjoining countries of Bangladesh, excepting Nepal, the amount of foreign exchange earned from tourism by India, Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, etc. is few times more than our entire export earnings. The developed countries of the world such as United States, Canada, The United Kingdom, France, Italy, Germany, Japan, etc are emphasizing on the due importance of the development of tourism, as it is helpful in attaining diversified prosperity. For the growth of tourism of any country the most important factors are political stability, law and order, improved communications and transport infrastructure, which include advanced railways, roads and highways, navigable waterways and importantly, aviation system, as well as, positive government policies regarding tourism. There are two types of tourists, one is local tourist and the other is foreign tourist. Foreign tourists play a special role in the matter of foreign exchange earnings, while local tourists help to inject impetus and momentum into the economy by way of domestic expenditure. To facilitate the rapid growth of tourism the developed countries of the world do not usually maintain state ownership and maintenance of tourist accommodation services, such as hotels and rest houses. Consequently, in nearly each district town of advanced countries, there are modern hotels with good accommodation and other facilities. When any state guest goes to any developed country, the accommodation and bilateral meetings are arranged in a hotel, commensurate with the status and position of the state guest. In the same way, at present, in the developed countries of the world, no permanent training institute is in place for the training of officials of both public and private sectors. Cheap transportation is a prime prerequisite for development of the tourism industry. In the developed countries, other than the ministers, no government official gets the facility of transport with driver provided by the state. In our country, till today, well organised taxi cab service has neither been developed in Dhaka nor in any other district headquarters. The geographical location of Bangladesh as well as its environment and people’s sincerity are congenial towards development of the tourism industry. Some of the prime tourist attractions, or locations, which possess a tremendous degree of tourism potential are the longest stretch of sea beach at Cox’s Bazar, landscape enveloped by hills, vast haors (marshlands found in Bangladesh’s north eastern part), an oceanic island (Saint Martin), coastal forestry, ancient Buddhist monuments, different Hindu and Muslim shrines (many of which have historical significance) and different Moghul establishments of the middle century. In addition, Sundarban, the world’s largest mangrove forest, was inscribed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1997, which would doubtlessly serve to add to the tourism value of Sundarban. Furthermore, as of present, Sundarban has been enlisted as one of the potential entries into the New Seven Wonders of Nature.

Christian weddings

Christians believe that marriage is a gift from God, one that should not be taken for granted. It is the right atmosphere to engage in sexual relations and to build a family life. Getting married in a church, in front of God, is very important. A marriage is a public declaration of love and commitment. This declaration is made in front of friends and family in a church ceremony. The history of marriage Marriage vows, in the form “To have and to hold from this day forward, for better for worse, for richer for poorer, in sickness and in health, to love and to cherish, till death us do part”, have been recited at UK church weddings since 1552. But before the wedding service was written into the Book of Common Prayer, marriages were much more informal: couples could simply promise themselves to one another at any time or place and the spoken word was as good as the written contract. In this audio clip, three academics - Janet Soskice, Reader in Modern Theology and Philosophical Theology, Cambridge University; Frederik Pedersen, Lecturer in History, Aberdeen University; and Christina Hardyment, social historian and journalist - discuss the history of and the role of state and church in marriage.

Rights of women in Islam

Mankind consists of men and women. Both of them have contributed to the development of human civilization throughout ages. Before the advent of Islam women were in a very low position. They were treated like animals. It was considered that women are created only to serve men. Islam raised women’s status from chattels and playthings to respectable human beings, equal to men in all respects. Islam has granted definite rights to women as daughters, sisters, mothers and wives. Islam has granted woman due social and economic rights, elevated her status, and provided moral and legal safeguards in its system for the protection of her rights and status. Woman enjoys the rights to inheritance from her husband, father, children and other near relations. All this wealth is her own property and she can use it, invest it, or give it away to others in any manner as she wishes. She has complete freedom to choose her husband and no one has the right to marry her to anyone without her consent. In Islam women have the same right as men to acquire knowledge. In fact, Islam has given real freedom and emancipation to women and elevated them to the status of humanity with dignity, honour and grace. It is said in the holy Quran: “O mankind! fear your Lord Who created you from a single soul and from it created its mate.” (Sura Nisa: Ayat 1) “O mankind! Indeed I (Allah) have created you from male and female and made you people and tribes that you may know one another.” (Sura Hujurat: Ayat 13). In holy Quran we see that Allah Jalla Shanuhu says: “Men shall have the benefit of what they earn and women shall have the benefit of what they earn.” (Sura Nisa: Ayat 32). Allah Jalla Shanuhu says: “I never let go to waste the labour of anyone who works among you whether male or female, for in My sight all of you are alike.” (Sura Al-Imran: Ayat 195). Islam has changed the mentality not only of men about women, but also of women about themselves. The writer is an Islamic Thinker and a former Director, Islamic Foundation, Bangladesh.

Holi: The festival of colours

Holi is the Hindu festival that welcomes the spring and celebrates the new life and energy of the season. Although Holi has religious roots, not much religious activity is involved in its celebration. Holi is the most energetic Indian festival, filled with fun and good humour; even the strict rules of separation between castes are abandoned. Holi is also called ‘The Festival of Colours’, and people celebrate the festival by smearing each other with paint, and throwing coloured powder and dye around in an atmosphere of great good humour.

International Women's Day

The idea of an international women’s day was first put forward at the turn of the 20th century. In 1910 the first international women’s conference was held in Copenhagen by the Second International and an international women’s day was established by German Socialist Clara Zetkin. In 1911, International Women’s Day was marked by more than a million people in Austria, Denmark, Germany and Switzerland on March 19. In 1913, International Women’s Day was transferred to March 8 and this day has remained the global date for International Women’s Day ever since. In 1975, the United Nations started celebrating March 8 as International Women’s Day. The UN secretary general, Ban Ki-moon, in his message, said ‘This year on International Women’s Day, we convert our outrage into action. We declare that we will prosecute crimes against women — and never allow women to be subjected to punishments for the abuses they have suffered.’ the UN Women executive director, Michelle Bachelet, called for action on ending violence against women. In her message for the day, Bachelet called on the international community to deliver on their commitments and to protect women’s right to live free of violence. Iterating that a change is possible and is happening in many parts of the world already, Bachelet called on all governments to accelerate progress and concrete policy actions to end violence against women. ‘This year on International Women’s Day, we say enough is enough.’ ‘Discrimination and violence against women and girls has no place in the 21st century. It is time for governments to keep their promises and protect human rights in line with the international conventions and agreements that they signed onto.

Gender inquality in Bangladesh

Gender inequality is the most pervasive, since it is common among the people belonging to all ethnicities and religions. Half of the country’s total population, after all, is women. The multifarious discriminations against women are being manifested in various forms, such as under representation in the policymaking bodies of the political parties, different branches of the state and socio-cultural organisations; less wages than their male counterparts for the equal amount of works in different industries; patriarchal domination of women by male members of the family; and so on and so forth. With half of the population, some 70 million, remaining politically, economically and culturally discriminated against and, that too, at all levels, ranging from the family to the state, the ruling class’s claims of making democratic progress is nothing but a travesty of truth. However, the left-leaning political parties are particular about mentioning the need for abolition of the existing political, economic cultural systems producing and reproducing inequalities in all spheres of public and private life, but the impression one gets from the manifestos and day-to-day political practices of these parties is that the pervasive inequalities would automatically be done away with as soon as the socialists seizes state power. This is, again, an impractical ‘belief’, given the empirical experiences that the now-defunct socialist world had witnessed.For the democratic growth of society and the state, which was a promise of the country’s liberation war, there is no alternative to taking up the issue of gender equality as a regular agendum by the forces of democracy. The issue needs to be part of the day-to-day political struggle against the forces of pseudo-democracy, which have reduced the concept of democracy to a mere transfer of power through elections every five year. Democracy, after all, is a way of life, based on equality of citizens, which is to be manifested at all levels of public and private life of a populace.

Democracy and equalities

Democracy, theoretically, is all about equality — political, economic and cultural — and, that too, of all citizens irrespective of their ethnic, religious and gender identity. While we sporadically hear some generalised talks of inequalities between the rich and the poor, Bengalis and non-Bengalis, Muslims and Hindus, and even men and women, at some seminars and symposiums, the mainstream political parties of the ruling elite do not have any well-thought-out political, economic or cultural programme to ensure democratic equality among the citizens. What we find in their written charters is nothing more than a few lines of rhetorical utterances about the need of doing away with economic inequalities between the rich and the poor and, of course, a few vague words about the need for the ‘empowerment of women’. In practice, they, while in power, pursue policies that continue to breed inequalities of all shades.

Prosecuting wartime sexual violence crimes under the 1973 Act (Bangladesh)

Section 3(2)(a) of the International Crimes (Tribunals) Act of 1973 lists rape, enslavement, torture and other inhumane acts (which might be considered as sexual violence crimes too) as “crime against humanity.” The 1973 Act does not, however, mention rape or sexual violences in its list of “war crimes” contained in section 3(2)(d), but does leave room for the crime to be so included. Further, since, the definition of genocide as provided under the 1973 Act is similar to Article 2 of the Genocide Convention and Article 6 of the Rome Statute, rape and other sexual violence crimes may well constitute as genocide under the 1973 Act too.

Prosecuting sexual violence crimes: The international law context

Article 27 of the Fourth Geneva Convention of 1949, related to the protection of civilian persons in times of war, explicitly prohibits wartime rape and enforced prostitution. These prohibitions were reinforced by the 1977 Additional Protocols to the 1949 Geneva Conventions. The Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court, 1998 gives the International Criminal Court jurisdiction over genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes. Articles 7 and 8 of the Rome Statute have included rape, sexual slavery, enforced prostitution, forced pregnancy, enforced sterilisation, and any other form of sexual violence both as a crime against humanity (explicit) and a war crime (implied). In 1998, sexual violence, in general and beyond rape, was recognised for the first time as a crime against humanity in the Prosecutor v. Jean-Paul Akayesu by the International Criminal Court for Rwanda (ICTR). Further, in 2001, in the Prosecutor v. Dragoljub Kunarak, Radomir Kovak and Zoran Vukovic the International Criminal Court for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) established that even a single rape may constitute a crime against humanity. Sexual violences were held to fall under the crimes against humanity through various means, for example, as enslavement, as sexual slavery, as persecution, as forced marriage, or even as torture. In 1998, sexual violence, in general and beyond rape, was also recognised for the first time as a war crime in the Prosecutor v. Furundzija by the ICTY. Similarly, as discussed above, a single rape may constitute a war crime. War rape can also be considered as an act of genocide, as the definition of “genocide” will show. As per Article 2 of the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide, 1948 and Article 6 of the Rome Statute, if it can be proved that wartime rape was used as a means to destroy, partially or totally, a specific group of people, it will come under the international definition of “genocide.” The ICTR in Prosecutor v. Jean-Paul Akayesu, established a precedent that rape is an element of the crime of genocide. On June 19, 2008, the 15-member UN Security Council unanimously adopted Resolution 1820 (2008) which clearly states that rape can constitute a war crime, a crime against humanity, or a constitutive act with respect to genocide.

Prosecuting 1971 rapes and other sexual violence crimes

In 1971, between 200,000 and 400,000 women were raped by members of the Pakistan army and its local collaborators. Many Bengali women were taken away by them and made to become sex slaves of the officers and soldiers for the duration of the war. These women received cruel, inhumane and degrading treatment. Also, rape and sexual slavery committed by the Pakistan army and its local collaborators during 1971 led to an estimated 25,000 forced pregnancies among Bengali women. Sexual violence crimes should be treated as the most henious crimes by the civilised nations of the world. The perpetrators of such crimes should never remain unpunished. Hence, the sexual violence crimes committed by the Pakistan army and its local collaborators against the Bengali women during the 1971 War of Liberation must be prosecuted.

Violence against Women

As we commemorate International Women’s Day, we must look back on a year of shocking crimes of violence against women and girls and ask ourselves how to usher in a better future. One young woman was gang-raped to death. Another barely survived but later committed suicide out of a sense of shame that should have attached to the perpetrators. Young teens were shot at close range for daring to seek an education. These atrocities, which rightly sparked global outrage, were part of a much larger problem that pervades virtually every society and every realm of life. Look around at the women you are with. Think of those you cherish in your families and your communities. And understand that there is a statistical likelihood that many of them have suffered violence in their lifetime. Even more have comforted a sister or friend, sharing their grief and anger following an attack.This year on International Women’s Day, we convert our outrage into action. We declare that we will prosecute crimes against women — and never allow women to be subjected to punishments for the abuses they have suffered. We renew our pledge to combat this global health menace wherever it may lurk — in homes and businesses, in war zones and placid countries, and in the minds of people who allow violence to continue. We should remember that women are in the form our dear mother, sister, wife. We all should dignify women and should say stop! stop! Stop! violence against women

A Railway Porter

A railway porter is a familiar figure who usually carries the luggage of the passengers. He generally look very strong and self-confident. He usually wears a uniform, blue or red in color. He always bears a piece of cloth to support the load on his head. His activities are confined to the railway stations. He becomes active when a train arrives at the railway station. He hurries to the passengers who have luggage to carry away. He helps the passengers get on the trains or get down from it. There are a number of porters in a railway station and they are well organized too. It is their bad habit that they demand a high rate for their service. Nevertheless they are helpful to the passengers to a great extent.

Thursday, March 7, 2013

May Day

May day is a glorious day in the history of the labourers worldwide. First day of the month of May is observed as the May Day. It is observed to show respects to demands of the laborers. The history behind it is very sorrowful. On May 3,1886, some workers gathered in demand of a minimum wage, safety laws, and eight hour work hours in a working day. Police fired in the crowd of strikers at the Mc Comick Harvest Machine Company, Chicago. Here at lest one people was killed and some others were seriously wounded. At the beginning of Industrial Revolution people had to work long hours both day and night. It was simply inhuman. It stopped when all labourers stood up. If the workers would not stand up and demand their rights, their future generation would fail to enjoy all the productive peivileges of the present day labourers. The day is most important for all the labourers both manual and mental worldwide. We need to observe it quite carefully and properly.

Sunday, March 3, 2013

Study Tour

Study tour is a part and parcel of our educational life. Seeing of something with our own eyes fulfills our practical knowledge. Study tour gives us a better knowledge of different places of the world. It widens the horizon of our mind and broadens our outlook. During the last summer vacation I and some of my classmates planned to go to a study tour to Cox's Bazar. Some of the students, along with I, of our class went there. We went there with two of our class teachers. We saw natural sights, vast expanse of water of the Bay, waves of the Bay, many ships and steamers with goods. Cox's Bazar is famous for its natural beauties. We gathered practical knowledge observing those things of cox's Bazar. We passed there four days. We bathed in the water of the Bay, made a lot of fun and took snaps of us with different interesting things. We ate rice with special fish of the Bay. The free movement in that place gave us much pleasure. Actually the tour was very important for taking fresh air and enjoyment and gathering practical knowledge.

Bangladesh

Bangladesh is our motherland. The constitutional name is People Republic of Bangladesh. She got her independence in 1971 through a long bloody War of Independence. Bangladesh was a province of Pakistan. Then it was called as East-Pakistan. The people of Bangladesh were valiant and tried to free their motherland from the discriminatory treatment of the ruler of Pakistan. However Bangladesh got her independence and now she independent and sovereign country many other country. The land area of Bangladesh is 1,47,570 sq. kilometers. Though Bangladesh is small country, it is one of the most densely populated country in the world. According to the census of 2011 the total population is 160 million plus.

Women at work in Bangladesh

Half of the total population of our country are women. In the near past women were confined to household chores. But things are changing rapidly. Now women are coming out and working in various fields. Education is the key of every success. So to be a successful human, education is needed for women also. No doubt, still women are not getting enough opportunities to flourish their studies. Yet, the role of the women in their family is very important. They do all kinds of house-hold works. They bring up children and take care of them. Again the role of women in the development of the country can never be ignored. In the garments sector thousands of women are working which is bringing foreign currency to our country. They can direct legislative, judiciary, and governing concerns in a perfect way. They can be a doctor to treat the patients, an engineer to help the engineering concerns, an architect to help the people in architecture. In the eastern and western developed countries women are engaged in development activities. Women are leading and conducting our country being head of governing body. They play an important role in the political field of our country. Women's contribution to the development of the country should be evaluated properly. Because, they are trying their level best to develop our country shoulder to shoulder with men.

Women's contribution to the development of our country

Half of the total population of our country are women. In the near past women were confined to household chores. But things are changing rapidly. Now women are coming out and working in various fields. Education is the key of every success. So to be a successful human, education is needed for women also. No doubt, still women are not getting enough opportunities to flourish their studies. Yet, the role of the women in their family is very important. They do all kinds of house-hold works. They bring up children and take care of them. Again the role of women in the development of the country can never be ignored. In the garments sector thousands of women are working which is bringing foreign currency to our country. They can direct legislative, judiciary, and governing concerns in a perfect way. They can be a doctor to treat the patients, an engineer to help the engineering concerns, an architect to help the people in architecture. In the eastern and western developed countries women are engaged in development activities. Women are leading and conducting our country being head of governing body. They play an important role in the political field of our country. Women's contribution to the development of the country should be evaluated properly. Because, they are trying their level best to develop our country shoulder to shoulder with men.

A Journey By Boat I Made


A pleasant journey is always enjoyable to us. A journey by boat is specially very pleasant and enjoyable to me. It was the month of December. Our annual examination was over. So we have enough time to make a journey by boat. We decided to go to the Sundarban from Bagherhat. We were very happy and excited. We were six in number. We hired a beautiful, big boat. We got up very early in the morning and took our breakfast. We started our journey from Bagherhat at 8 am. There were two boatmen. The sky was clear. The river was calm and full to the brim. At first the boatmen plied the boat with oars. When the wind was favourable they set sail. Soon the boat began to move fast. There were ripples. The boatmen were singing. We enjoyed the scenery of the river. We saw many boats big and small plying up and down. We saw fishermen were cathcing fishes in the river. Boys and girls were found swimming. Women were going home with jars filled with water. There were green fields on both sides of the river. Cattle were grazing there. At about 12 pm we reached the Shunderban. We saw many wild animals there. We observed the natural beauty of Sunderban. We took our lunch at 2 pm. Having a little rest we strated our return journey. It was late afternoon. The sun was setting. The crimsom ray of the sun was reflecting in the water of the river. Soon It became dark all arround. Thousands of stars were twinkling in the sky. We enjoyed the beauty of sky. We reached Bagherhat at 9 pm. Finally it can be stated that the journey gave me much pleasure. It was the most pleasant journey in my life. I enjoyed it so much that the memory of the journey will remain ever fresh in my heart.

The National Memorial

The national memorial is situated at Savar in Dhaka. It has great significance for the future generation. Our descendants will learn about the liberation war and its glorious achievement from it. It symbolizes the nation's respect for the martyrs of the War of Liberation. Arithmetically, It stands 150 feet tall. But every martyr it symbolizes stands much taller. It is an achievement which is immeasurable. There are seven towers in it. Its foundation was lain on the first anniversary of the Victory Day. It is built with concrete. It stands on a base which is 130 feet wide. The relics of the Liberation War will be kept in the museum built near the monument. The memorial reminds its visitors the great sacrifices of the freedom loving people of Bangladesh. It was built to warn all oppressors that the weapons of freedom need not be very big and that oppression will always be defeated. I feel proud standing before it. I show respect standing before it. About 5 months ago I visited it. I feel very happy reaching there. The largest complex of the national memorial have impressed me most. People show respect thereby giving garlands and bowing their heads.

Saturday, March 2, 2013

Mother Teresa

Mother  Teresa was a great personality. She was a great saint, who was in charge of a missionary at Kolkata in India.  She was born in the then Yogoslavia in the early of the 20th century.  But she settled in India and also died there.  Her profession was serving humanity.  For serving wretched humanity she travelled different countries.  She did not sit idle even for a single day without serving humanity.  She was a model of great humanity.  With a wonderful feeling of humanity and a soft sense of goodness of God she served the sick people.  She never hated serving the sick people.  was is a great  source of inspiration to the people world wide.  Because of her wonderful feeling towards the wretched humanity she lives in the heart of the people.  She won the heart of the people since she served them like the lively goddess on earth.  Because of her great sacrifice she was given noble prize in peace.  All the money she got out of the prizes were spent for serving humanity.  This great lady passed away in the last year of the last century. It is an irreparable loss to the people of the world. We can’t forget her great contribution to the world. She is still alive in the depth of our heart.

Friday, March 1, 2013

Victory Day of Bangladesh

Victory means the rebuilt of self-immolation of 30 lacs people. The 16th December is the victory Day of Bangladesh. Bangladesh got her freedom sacrificing the lives of 30 lacs people. It is a red letter day in the history of Bangladesh. In 1971, Bangladesh discloses herself as a new country and gets a place in the world map. On the 16th December we pompously celebrate the Victory Day every year. The government has declared it a public holiday. Our national flag is hoisted at schools, colleges, universities and even every institutions and offices of Bangladesh. We pray to almighty Allah for the martyrs of our liberation war. Thus we celebrate the day with pleasures. So we feel proud of our nation.

A Hartal Day

A hartal day is a symbol of non-violent protest. Everything ramains closed on a hartal day. Generally the people who are deprived of their demands. When dissatisfaction grows among a group of people or political parties, hartal becomes a way to show that. Hartal is democratic but nowadays, it has become very frequent. Recently we have experienced a lot of it. Hartal may be called on various issues. On a hartal day people normally stay at home and pass their time idly. But the government servants have to attend their offices. During hartal motor-vehicles do not run on roads, people move on foot and sometimes rickshaws are permitted to ply on roads. It affects our economy in various ways. However, it is true that hartal is very harmful for a country. But it, at times, solves problems. So it should be observed withing some limit.

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